The Crisis in Brazil’s Left: Future Radicalism to be Syncretic in Scope

sealBy Sputnik Brazil with CSS input by Paul Antonopoulos – CSS Project Director;  MENA and Latin America Research Fellow. – translated by Paul Antonopoulos.

 

The End of the Brazilian Left? Analysis and Criticisms

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OE Former leftist Brazilian President Luís Inácio Lula da Silva left the headquarters of the ABC Metalworkers’ Union and turned himself in to the Federal Police at 6:42pm on April 7, 2018, becoming the first ex-president arrested in the history of the country. A year later, experts have assessed the impact of Lula’s imprisonment and the future of the left while right-wing Zionist-loving Jair Messias Bolsonaro is the current president.

For Ricardo Ismael, political scientist and professor at Pontifícia Universidade Católica-Rio, the problem is from the culmination of weariness accumulated after the arrest of the supposedly most successful leftist leader in Brazil which was triggered by the sequence of denunciations about Lula’s relations with companies linked to Petrobras (Brazil´s state-owned oil company). A year later, Ismael evaluates that the former president is still an important figure in Brazil, but questioning his legitimacy tends to undermine the authority and respect the people have towards the Worker Party (PT) leader.

“There is a lot of wear and tear from Operation Car Wash*, especially in the South, Southeast and Midwest of the country, and although the Northeast still preserves a bit of political capital, mainly due to social programs made during the [Lula] government [to this poor region of Brazil] – today there is a much greater questioning of Lula’s political leadership, even in leftist circles,” said the professor.

The opinion is shared by Fundação Getulio Vargas São Paulo professor, Claudio Couto. For him, Lula remains present in the national imagination and is still stamped in the Brazilian news – helping to catapult Haddad [Lula´s successor] to the second round of the 2018 elections, even with a strong rejection of the PT – Lula is gradually beginning to be seen as a barrier to the renewal of leftist ideology by party leaders adjacent to the metallurgical legend.

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The Rise of Christian Zionism – The Christian Evangelical Assault on Palestine

By Paul Antonopoulos – CSS Project Director;  MENA and Latin America Research Fellow

The Christian Evangelical Assault on Palestine Based in a Claimed Literal Interpretation of the Bible, Absent Genuine Religious Content

 

resident of the United States, Donald Trump formerly allowed the relocation of the U.S Embassy in occupied Palestine to be relocated from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, sparking unrest across the entire Muslim world, despite the warnings given to him by his own national security team. The opening prayer at the new Embassy was delivered by Evangelical Reverend Robert Jeffress with the closing prayer given by Evangelical Reverend John C. Hagee on May 14, 2018, the 70th anniversary of the creation of the Zionist entity commonly known as Israel. It was unsurprising to see Evangelical pastors playing such a key role at this event as 81% of Evangelical Christians voted for Trump.

Who are the Evangelicals? Evangelicalism is a puritanical sect of Christianity that take a literal interpretation of the Christian scriptures, comparable to the Wahhabis of Sunni Islam, and devoid of any spirituality. In addition to their domestic efforts to roll back liberal ideals and defend neo-liberalism in the USA, they also take a radical foreign policy that always attempts to justify US interventionism, including in Palestine. This puritanical interpretation of Christianity has seen it galvanize and create a strong network of megachurches, schools and universities, and create a behemoth media presence on radio, television and new mass media such as apps and social media.

Analysts were left confused why Trump would cause such a great provocation by recognizing Jerusalem as “Israel’s eternal capital.” The answer is quite a straightforward one.

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The Fourth Position – Series

By: Tim Kirby

The Fourth Position and “Father’s Will”

Part I and Episode I – “I or We?”

Editor’s note: “Fathers’ Will” is an ongoing series of essays regarding the past, present and future of ideology and how we can move forward to an Illiberal age written by award-winning political analyst and radio talk show host Tim Kirby.

“The Fourth Position” is the related video series regarding the same – the 1st episode, “I or We?”, is now available to the public on our YouTube Channel, “Center for Syncretic Studies“. – Joaquin Flores

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he so-called “End of History” is beginning to end. With the victory of Liberalism over Communism it seemed to many in the 90’s that we had entered into the final political theory, that there would no longer be any ideological development.

Liberalism in the 1990’s was to be the alpha and omega, a system for the whole world that “demonstrably” worked “the best” for all of humanity. At the time this seemed like an obvious truth as Liberalism proved itself to “work better” for the masses than Communism. But now, a mere 30 years later the thousand-year-reich of Liberalism is corroding before our eyes and rather quickly. History has not ended, there is no ultimate solution to all problems and the human story continues on. The West is committing demographic suicide, Chinese Communism is the second largest economy in the world, and the world finds itself yet again divided into SCO and NATO, BRICS and WTO etc.

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Perspectives on Modernity in Crisis

Small Logo By: Ronald Thomas West

The Decline of the West & its Shaping by Long-Standing European Misconceptions on the Essence of Society and Being

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502377t should be said first that the following observations offer a view that does not originate with Western thought, and therefore in the Western academic sense may be deemed insufficient.

This is for two reasons, primarily; 1) the thought that all analysis must be subject to exam for the fact of necessary cultural bias, when bias must be synonymous to belief, and; 2) this essay does not delve deeply into the subject academically but necessarily notes certain phenomena in a context of inter-cultural observation, exogenous to what is known as the ‘Institution’. This is necessitated by the observation that Western academia can be (more often than not often is as a matter of rule) a feedback loop where mistaken ideas are perpetrated by a process of ‘peer review’, or subjected to strict framing by ‘empiricism’ (3rd party interpretation) with a vested interest in protecting a status quo.

The method used here is not Western but derives from an oral history form exogenous to European culture. This method proposes a story constructed from metadata and is a hybrid in that philosophical elements of non-Western oral history and related to underlying principles of thought and a format is applied to (or superimposed upon) Western metadata.

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The Multipolar Revolution: Syncretic Perspectives – Part III

Small Logo By: Jafe Arnold

Marx and the Indo-European Mode of Production

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Of the three main socio-political ideologies of modernity – Liberalism, Marxism, and Fascism (and their offshoots) – Marxism is arguably the most complex, scientific, and paradoxical. On the one hand, the theories of Karl Marx are no less contextually rooted in their 19th century Western European environment than other thinkers and currents that contributed to the first and third political ideologies. On the other hand, Marxism proved to be something more historically commanding and globally relevant than the myriad of other 19th century frameworks and theories which proposed a socio-political trajectory of modernity based on one or another meta-historical philosophical narrative. Societies claiming to be consciously guided by Marxist ideology and realizing its political pivot – the “dictatorship of the proletariat” – once covered nearly half of the globe for half of the most turbulent 20th century, thereby shaping a unique experience of modernity for more than a billion people and rather convincingly insisting that communism would be “the end of history.”

In this installment, we will address the dilemma of Marxism from two standpoints: (1) weighing the benefits, downsides, and paradoxes of Marx’s framework, and (2) demonstrating the relevance of Marxism’s identification of the relations of production and class to understanding the mythological, sociological, and political-economic developmental trends that uniquely affected primordial Indo-European society. With these analyses integrated into our arsenal, we can move ever closer to understanding the modernity that we are leaving, how it came about, and the multipolar world into which we are moving.  In order to broach such, we must first establish why it is worth picking Marx up again at all. Continue reading