Kaminski on Pavel Gubarev’s “The Torch of Novorossiya”

A Review of Gubarev’s book on the Donbass Revolution and Orthodox-Communist Syncretism

Screen Shot 2016-04-01 at 14.28.35By: Jacek C. Kaminski – translated by Jafe Arnold

Jacek C. Kaminski is a Polish journalist and leftist activist. He is an editor of “Socjalizm Teraz” (Socialism Now), the co-founder of the Movement for Social Justice, and the Polish representative of the International Human Rights Movement “World without Nazism.”

pavel-gubarev-1

Font BOE Pavel Gubarev’s book The Torch of Novorossiya is an extremely important source for understanding the essence of the dramatic political and military struggles now taking place in Ukraine. We are dealing not only with the testimony of an important participant in the events, but also the bold forecasts of a political visionary which have a fair chance of being realized.

In Poland, the 32-year old figure of Pavel Gubarev might be forgotten, but in Ukraine, and especially in Donetsk, he still has a considerable number of followers. We recall that the author was one of the initiators of the uprising in Donbass which led to the proclamation of the Donetsk People’s Republic and the civil war in Ukraine. After the victory of the Euromaidan in Kiev, he initiated the creation of the People’s Militia of Donbass which became the core of the DPR army. On March 1, 2014, Gubarev became the People’s Governor of the Donetsk region, a development which gave the signal for an uprising against the Euromaidan putschists of Kiev.

After being detained by the Security Service of Ukraine (SBU) within a week, he was released months following his arrest in the course of war prisoner exchanges thanks to the efforts of the rebel garrison in Slavyansk and the legendary Colonel Igor Strelkov. During the war, Gubarev organized logistics and supplies for Slavyansk after being stormed by soldiers of the Kiev junta and he stood at the head of the “Novorossiya” political movement. He now holds some criticisms of the current authorities of the people’s republics of Donbass, but he nevertheless believes in the realization of his idea of a Great Novorossiya. His proposed vision makes up one of the parts of the publication.

Continue reading

Posted in External Publications, Theology & Religion, Theory, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

CSS participates in conference “Balkans and Middle East: Interconnections and Intersections”

Small Logo By: Jafe Arnold 

CSS participates in conference “Balkans and Middle East: Interconnections and Intersections”

12899536_1843234522570746_377397925_o

Left to right: Joaquin Flores, Leonid Savin, Misha Stojadinovic, Irena Aleksic

On Wednesday morning, March 24th in Belgrade, Serbia, several dozen students, scholars, analysts, and distinguished guests including diplomatic representatives from Tunisia, Libya, Iran, Syria, Iraq, and Republika Srpska gathered at the University of Belgrade’s Faculty of International Politics and Security for the conference “The Balkans and the Middle East: Interconnections and Intersections.” Organized by the faculty in cooperation with Katehon Think Tank and with the participation of the Center for Syncretic Studies, the conference sought to discuss pressing geopolitical and geo-strategic issues in the format of a scientific and diplomatic roundtable, and present Katehon’s promising new initiatives in the field of international relations. The issues specifically addressed by the conference included the refugee crisis, cybersecurity, economic cooperation amidst market crises, and the role of ex-colonial powers in conflicts in the Balkans and the Middle East. The Center was represented by Director Joaquin Flores, who chaired the event, Jafe Arnold, and Novak Drashkovic.

Continue reading

Posted in Multimedia, Press Releases, Strategy & Tactics, Theory, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Pacifism for Whom? An Ode to the God of War

NR_STARBy: Gustavo Aguiar – translated by Jafe Arnold 

Pacifism for Whom? An Ode to the God of War

italian-priest-communion-english-soldiers

“Only the dead have seen the end of war” – Plato 

502377n the 1960’s, at the height of the hippie movement and amidst protests against the Vietnam War, a new type of man emerged: the pacifist man whose anti-militant, progressive and social democratic spirit (with crisp Trotskyist tears) served as the cement for consolidating a redefinition of the revolutionary status established by the old proletarian left of the 19th century. Far from intending to justify the war crimes perpetrated by Yankee detachments in North Vietnamese villages and towns, or the negligible goals that led Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon to deploy tanks and helicopters on the plains of Indo-China, this paper aims to show the way in which the mentality of the New Left eventually engenders thought that is diametrically opposite to the slogans that adorn the signs in the subversive scenario of protests. Today, the same slogans are used as instruments of destabilization around the globe in service of the neocolonialist hyper-powers. Continue reading

Posted in Theory, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

Tragedy & Farce: Reconsidering Marxian Superstructural Analysis of Heterodox Social Movements

Small Logo By: Jafe Arnold 

Tragedy & Farce: Reconsidering Marxian Superstructural Analysis of Heterodox Social Movements 

  • Part II: A Heuristic Reconsideration of Marxism and Modernity in Eurasia 

12476003_923782057657004_192987156_n

502377n the introduction to this series, we presented and provided some cursory remarks on the general topic of our investigation. We drew attention to the problematic application of Marx’s thesis concerning the “poetry of the past” (as presented in The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte) and the overriding confusion of the relationship between the superstructure (ideology, the “poetry”) and the base (objective class forces) which manifests itself when Marxists analyze and attempt to identify the trajectory of socio-political movements, particularly those syncretic ones in the late modern and post-modern era which often defy normative stereotypes of aesthetics, presenting apparently “unorthodox,” and perhaps contradictory superstructural “cues,” the latter of which, given the faulty precedent set by Marx in contradiction to this own framework, confuses Marxists in their analyses and more often than not leads to erroneous categorizations of otherwise “progressive” movements or states as “reactionary.”

In this installment, we will delve deeper into the theoretical underpinnings of Marxism as an ideology of Modernity with the aim of uncovering the paradoxes which underly the precedent set by Marx in The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte. We will then proceed to present the general contours along which our study will unfold as we examine Marxism itself through its own lens, reconsider its perception of heterodox socio-political movements and the theoretical and practical implications therein, and trace the trajectory of Marxism’s paradoxical hermeneutics in the direction of a syncretic political ideology.

Marxism, the 20th Century, and the Fourth Political Theory

It has long since become clear that the First Political Theory (1PT), Liberalism, emerged from the 20th century as the victorious ideology of Modernity. This unavoidable fact and its practical implications have been analyzed by a number of scholars in a wide variety of fields. The other two main socio-political theories, Marxism (with its various offshoots) and Fascism (along with its various strains), were played against each other, demonized from all directions, and dealt decisive defeats in crucial spheres at different times by the massive ideological, political-economic, and military complex of the 1PT which since the 1990’s became the nightmarish norm for massive swathes of the world’s population. Now, however, as this “End of History” has revealed itself to become increasingly untenable, intolerable, and undesirable, growing attention has been turned towards the various anti-liberal ideologies of Modernity with an eye towards scavenging and critically analyzing their nominal as well as paradoxical anti-Liberal and anti-Modern elements.[1] Continue reading

Posted in Theory, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The “Polish Question” at a Crossroads

Small Logo By: Jafe Arnold

The “Polish Question” at a Crossroads

Polish-Nationalists

printable-letter-holyunion-over the past several months, the geopolitical role of Poland in relation to the war in Ukraine and Eurasian and European integration projects has once again become an increasingly frequently visited topic. On the one hand, recent presidential and parliamentary elections in Poland have reshuffled the posts of the ruling Atlanticist oligarchy, thereby compelling prominent political issues to be revisited by representatives of the political elite in public debates, PR campaigns, policy deliberations, etc. This has once again brought the acute problems facing Polish statehood and the Atlanticist domination of Poland’s political, economic, cultural, and information spheres into the spotlight.

On the other hand, in addition to a mere rehashing and repetitive exposure of Atlanticism in Poland, recent political developments including the final electoral defeat of the post-socialist Left, the ascent of the Law and Justice party to power, the rise and entanglement of new oppositional forces, the reemergence of nationalism, and the steady but sure growth of anti-Atlanticist initiatives in various spheres, have threatened to transform the framework of Polish political and geopolitical discourse. In short, the crucial questions of Polish statehood, geopolitics, and civilizational identity are once again up for debate, and their reemergence within the context of the heightened confrontation between the Eurasian and Atlanticist projects present various new opportunities, paradigms, paradoxes, and questions which deserve analysis.

Continue reading

Posted in Theory, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment